HONORS CLASSES Fall 2016

Seminars

50:525:103:01 (Art) 
Wu: Japanese Art from Samurai to Anime (G)
T 3:00-5:40, CS 202
Course note: Satisfies a Fine Arts requirement

Japanese art and popular culture have attracted significant global interest in contemporary times. However, contrary to assumptions that these visual lexicons are products of a unique and ancient Japanese culture, many of the visual elements found in Japanese popular arts developed as a result of cultural exchanges with other regions of East Asia and the West. This course explores several aspects of Japanese visual culture from the earliest times to the present, including the art and culture of the samurai, ink painting, woodblock prints, Zen art, tea culture, decorative arts, technology and multimedia, manga, and Japanese animation. By tracing the historical origins of these genres and situating them in global context, this course excavates their cultural and social significance both in Japan and around the world, in both the past and the present.

50:525:103:02
Pilliod, Medieval Art and Culture
M 1:20pm-4:10pm, Fine Arts Building 227
Course note: Satisfies a Fine Arts requirement

Visual Culture of the Middle Ages from the 4th to the 14th centuries is a broad, global view that overturns that standard notions of the “Dark Ages” as an era of decline and Eurocentrism. Topics include Early Christian, Byzantine, Islamic, Romanesque and Gothic art and architecture.  This course will start with the collapse of the Roman Empire and the new Christian art that grew out of the traditions of Greek, Roman, and Ancient Near Eastern culture.  Then we will examine the Byzantine Empire that carried on, preserving and re-configuring art for a new world order.  The later rise of European centers from Ireland to Germany, and the evolution of metal arts, manuscript illumination, stained-glass, and enamels will be traced.  The impact of the Crusades on the transmission of ideas and objects through cultural exchange, and a look at the major monuments of Islamic Art will provide a counterpoint to the Western European cultural discussion. The stunning Gothic cathedrals will conclude the course.  In addition to an exercise to seek out the “Medieval Camden,” a Saturday trip to the MetCloisters in New York (the premier museum for medieval objects in this country) will substitute for one of our weekly class meetings. Students will be responsible for writing a number of short exercises, summaries, or essays that will designed to show you how to write about art. No midterm or final.

50:525:109:01 (English)
Ledoux: Romantic Women
TTh 3:00-4:20, CS 203
Course note: Satisfies a Literature or Humanities requirement

This course will examine the significant, but historically overlooked, contribution women writers made to the development of Romanticism.  During our investigation we will encounter formal and thematic innovations women made in a variety of genres, including poetry, non-fiction prose, and the novel.  Authors will include Jane Austen, Charlotte Smith, Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Shelley, and Dorothy Wordsworth among others.

50:525:109:02 (English) 
Habib: Islamic Literature
TTh 11:00-12:20, WRT 202
Course note: Satisfies a Literature requirement; also satisfies the Global (G) requirement in the College of Arts and Sciences

What lies behind the current atmosphere of Islamophobia? What does the Qur’an really say about terrorism? About war? About women? What are the true meanings of jihad? What is Islam’s attitude toward Jews and Christians? How do the great Islamic philosophers and poets approach their own faith? Why is Rumi – an Iranian poet – the most popular poet in America today? What kinds of connections subsist between the literature and philosophy of Islam and the categories of Medieval European thought? What role does Islam play in the historical development of Hegel’s dialectic? What are the connections between Islam and capitalism? Islam and socialism? These are some of the questions that have been ushered into prominence by recent events on the stage of international politics. This course will cover the fundamental beliefs of Islam and the development of its theology and literature, as well as its relation to Judaism and Christianity. We will examine a number of major literary and philosophical texts in the Islamic tradition, relating their central themes and dispositions to movements in the contemporary Islamic world.

50:525:112:01 (History)
Bernstein: Putin’s Russia 
TTh 11:00-12:20, CS 202
Course note: Satisfies a History requirement

Vladimir Putin has been the ruler of Russia since the year 2000. Despite accusations from the liberal opposition that Putin is a demagogue, Putin remains extremely popular. This is not simply due to his PR-machine and his administration’s control of the mass media: most Russians credit him for bringing them back from the brink of economic ruin and other humiliations after the end of the Cold War. As one college student told a Hungarian journalist, “It had been the tsar before and now it’s Putin, he is like God to me…. He is a perfect man—politician, sportsman, family man!”

Our class will study the man and his milieu, keeping up on current events through web-based media while we explore recent Russian history. Who is Putin? What can we make of contemporary Russia? As we address questions about Putin’s personality, policies, and plans, we will also explore Russian intervention in Ukraine, anti-LGBTQ legislation and attitudes, the role of non-Russian nationalities, environmental challenges, and the suppression of Pussy Riot and other oppositional movements.

50:525:117:01 (Philosophy)
Sacks: Philosophy of Surveillance in the Digital Age
M 2:50-5:30, CS 202
Course note: Satisfies a requirement in History, Philosophy, or Religion

Surveillance in its state and corporate forms has long been a feature of liberal societies. But in the digital age both the scope and character of surveillance has undergone considerable change. This seminar will introduce students to strategies of governance and securitization at work in the digital age, and how those strategies may been seen to both advance and be at odds with democratic ideals dating back to antiquity. We will consider classical and contemporary texts that explicate the concept of surveillance, examine justifications and criticisms of its deployment in digital environments, and seek to develop an understanding of the ways “big data” surveillance is tied up with power, with the potential to profoundly alter social and political life.

50:525:120:01; 50:830:101:H1
Meier: Introduction to Psychology (Open only to Nursing & Psychology majors)
TTh 9:30-10:50, BSB 335
Course note: Satisfies a Social Sciences requirement in Arts and Sciences, the “Introduction to Psychology” option in Business. 

The main goal of the Introduction to Psychology is to gain fundamental knowledge of the field of psychology and human behavior. To do this, we will investigate various concepts, theories, and research studies across a wide variety of sub-fields in psychology, including motivation, development, and mental illness. Furthermore, we will discuss the interdisciplinary nature of the field, and the application of psychology to other disciplines, such as health. Particular emphasis will be placed on the following: 1) Understanding the scientific method as it applies to the field; 2) critically thinking about psychological ideas and theories; and 3) applying what we learn to our everyday lives. Students will engage in daily activities, such as writing prompts and online polls, to generate class discussions about the materials. Other work will include assigned textbook and research article readings, quizzes, exams, and the option to either participate in research within the Psychology or, alternatively, write a research paper. Required in the School of Nursing; priority to Nursing students.

50:525:120:02; 50:830:101:H2
O’Donnell: Introduction to Psychology (Open only to Nursing & Psychology majors)
MW 1:20-2:40, CS 202
Course note: Satisfies a Social Sciences requirement in Arts and Sciences, the “Introduction to Psychology” option in Business.

The main goal of the Introduction to Psychology is to provide fundamental knowledge of the field of psychology and human behavior. To do this, we will investigate various concepts, theories, and research studies across a wide variety of sub-fields in psychology, including motivation, development, and mental illness. Furthermore, we will discuss the interdisciplinary nature of the field, and the application of psychology to other disciplines, such as health. Particular emphasis will be placed on the following: 1) Understanding the scientific method as it applies to the field; 2) critically thinking about psychological ideas and theories; and 3) applying what we learn to our everyday lives. Students will engage in daily activities, such as writing prompts and participating in online polls, to generate class discussions about the materials. Other work will include assigned textbook and research article readings, quizzes, exams, and the option either to participate in research within the Psychology or, alternatively, to write a research paper. Required in the School of Nursing; priority to Nursing students.

50:525:128:01 (Urban Studies)
Hoffman: Making Social Change (Open only to students participating in the Civic Scholars program)
W 2:50-5:30, CS 203
Course note: Satisfies a Social Sciences requirement

In this seminar we will examine the opportunities, strategies, and processes (governmental, organizational, etc.) for making social change on small and large scales and on various institutional platforms. We will take up a range of examples of efforts to make such change from the conception of an idea through its marketing and implementation, the so-called “how-tos.” Students will come to understand how others have made change and will have the opportunity to envision themselves as agents of change in areas such as education, health, poverty, public safety, and sustainability. The course includes an experiential learning component that will involve field work and research in the city of Camden.

52:525:300:01
Schindler: Spirituality in Business: Balancing Head and Heart 
TTh 11:00-12:20, CS 203
Course note: Satisfies a free elective in Nursing, an Approved Elective (School 52, 300 level) in Business

In the business world, and often in the society at large, there is a persistent emphasis on our rational and material side (our “head”). There is much less attention to our spiritual side (our “heart”). The spiritual aspects of our experience – our imagination, our hopes and dreams, the feelings and impressions of our innermost thoughts – are commonly devalued, neglected, misinterpreted, and even suppressed. Gaining an awareness and appreciation of our spiritual side helps restore a balance that can enhance our ability to manage ourselves and lead others. In this course, we study both scientific research and traditional wisdom to better understand our spiritual side. We apply these understandings to the everyday activities of dealing with customers, getting along with others in an organization, and keeping on the path toward achieving our personal goals.

Civilizations and Heritages

Note: All sections satisfy the Civilizations and Heritages requirement in the General Education Requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, School of Nursing, and School of Business.

50:082:203:H1; cross-listed as 50:525:103:02
Pilliod, Medieval Art and Culture
M 1:20pm-4:10pm, Fine Arts Building 227

Visual Culture of the Middle Ages from the 4th to the 14th centuries is a broad, global view that overturns that standard notions of the “Dark Ages” as an era of decline and Eurocentrism. Topics include Early Christian, Byzantine, Islamic, Romanesque and Gothic art and architecture.  This course will start with the collapse of the Roman Empire and the new Christian art that grew out of the traditions of Greek, Roman, and Ancient Near Eastern culture.  Then we will examine the Byzantine Empire that carried on, preserving and re-configuring art for a new world order.  The later rise of European centers from Ireland to Germany, and the evolution of metal arts, manuscript illumination, stained-glass, and enamels will be traced.  The impact of the Crusades on the transmission of ideas and objects through cultural exchange, and a look at the major monuments of Islamic Art will provide a counterpoint to the Western European cultural discussion. The stunning Gothic cathedrals will conclude the course.  In addition to an exercise to seek out the “Medieval Camden,” a Saturday trip to the MetCloisters in New York (the premier museum for medieval objects in this country) will substitute for one of our weekly class meetings. Students will be responsible for writing a number of short exercises, summaries, or essays that will designed to show you how to write about art. No midterm or final.

50:350:238:H1
Barbarese, World Masterpieces I 
TTh 11am-12:20pm, CS 110

A classic is a work that is read in order to be re-read, revisited, revised out of admiration or loathing–and usually here to stay. For the Greeks, Homer was their “bible,” the source of ethical and practical wisdom; in the Middle Ages, Virgil’s Aeneid was read as authorized history and of a source of prophetic wisdom.

Readings of ancient and classical literature in translation, World Masterpieces gathers work that is classical, that is, foundational to the way we think and behave. Beginning with a study of primary and secondary epic, fromGilgamesh and Homer’s Odyssey, the course moves forward into the Golden Age of Athens, with excerpts from classical philosophy and tragedy, then into a comparison of the Old and New Testaments (including apocrypha) and concludes with selections from Turold’s The Song of Roland, Virgil’s Aeneid, Dante’s Inferno, and Chaucer’s Tales. The course will include comparisons of competing translations of the readings–none of which was originally written in modern English–and variants of the same text. Expect weekly quizzes, a mid-term and final exam, and two short papers.

50:350:238:H2
Vial, World Masterpieces I
M 3pm-5:40pm, ATG 123

In concept, World Masterpieces I covers great literature from the beginning of time through the (European) medieval period. That is a list impossible to condense into one semester of reading. Instead, we will read a handful of great works from around the globe to explore in some depth. Our readings will include religious texts such as the Bible, the Bhagavad-Gita, and the Qur’an, heroic tales from ancient Greece and Africa, and poetry from Asia and the Middle East. Readings will be organized along thematic and genre lines—we will develop a sense of chronology and cultural context as we go. Grading for the course will be based on your engagement with the readings as demonstrated through lively class discussions and group activities. In addition, you will write two papers and a final exam.

50:700:201:H1
Zaki, Facing the Music 
TTh 9:30am-10:50am, FA 219

The main objective of Facing the Music is to focus on listening to music and making sense of what is heard. In order to accomplish this, the class is going to study a wide range of western art music from different historical periods in order to gain exposure to diverse ways of thinking about music. Students will examine various aspects of music that define style, genre, and period, and how they develop and change over time. Most importantly, students will also develop a musical vocabulary to discuss these elements with greater clarity and understanding. In addition to regular reading and listening assignments, there will be weekly QAs, a short paper/concert review, and two exams that will be cumulative for each half of the class.

No prior musical knowledge is required, but an enthusiasm for all kinds of music will be helpful!